American Art Collector |  August 2011

Charleston inspirations

 

In 2004, after an illustrious 12-year career in the securities brokerage industry, Kevin LePrince abandoned his post as a vice president with a major firm to pursue art. LePrince, who is a member of Oil Painters of America, has since gained esteem as an artist and is represented by fine art galleries in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Colorado. And just a few months ago LePrince added co-owner to his resume when he opened Reinert LePrince Fine Art with Rick Reinert in Charleston, South Carolina. Reinert LePrince Fine Art, located on King Street, will exhibit LePrince's work from August 5 to 26. Approximately 20 oil on linen and oil on panel works in a variety of sizes will hang in the gallery.

For his paintings, LePrince has been motivated by what surrounds him – the city of Charleston. As he explains, "[Charleston] has a never-ending source of inspiration with all its quaint restaurant interiors, streets rich with architecture reminiscent of old European cities, lush gardens, seasonal shifts that illuminate the sunset differently depending on the time of year. Wildlife is abundant here as well. I often find the creatures in the Lowcountry to be full of personality. The marshes here are full of life and mystery."

Because of the expansive sources of inspiration in the area, LePrince paints a variety of genres from landscapes to wildlife. His works are created using a limited palette of color – in general, two yellows, two blues, and two reds.

The Collector Says...
"We own many of Kevin's paintings, one of his large stylized heron paintings hangs in the entryway to our home and it never fails to put a smile on our face and the faces of our guests. It is extraordinary and always is a great talking point with company."
- Andy Warlick, Gastonia, North Carolina

While painting landscapes, LePrince often recalls when he used to take his father's johnboat out after school and would have to rush home before it got too dark as not to upset his mother. Reminiscent of the memory is what LePrince hopes to give collectors while viewing his landscapes, "an escape from the moment... and opportunity to drift down a calm creek at the end of a long day."

His wildlife works, on the other hand, are meant to bring to life their human qualities.

"I have has so many people walk up to such a painting and see all the 'characters' of their own family," says LePrince. "When I first started painting animals I always attempted to paint them as the eye sees them. Now I just try to paint their personalities."